FAQ

FAQ

You don’t look Hawaiian! Is your hula “real” or is it just made up/copied from YouTube?
For more about Tamsin’s background and journey into hula, click here.
HHUK’s hula comes direct from a long-standing line of practitioners in Hawaiʻi, and our training and teaching is guided by Kumu Hula Rich Pedrina and Hālau Hula ‘O Nāpunaheleonāpua. We’re privileged to be part of a vast Hawaiʻi-based and global ʻohana including mentors, skill and cultural experts and supporters.

I’ve never danced (hula) before! Is this for me?
Everyone is welcome to drop in to basics practice sessions on Zoom.
If you’ve never seen or danced hula, have never danced at all, or are coming from a different dance or cultural discipline, our beginners class does not require prior knowledge or experience and will help you build a solid foundation.
All live classes start at beginner level.

I’m a more experienced dancer, is there a class for that?
Yes! You can attend as many classes as you want, and our improvers class on Zoom is where it’s at if you’re looking to progress and/or challenge yourself. If you’re experienced but new to hula with HHUK, please consider joining us in beginners class for a while first.

Is hula just for women?
No! Absolutely not, everyone is welcome. If you have any questions, please get in touch.

Can kids take these classes?
At this time classes are not structured for kids and any children must be accompanied/supervised by a participating adult.
If you have children, a local group, or school that would like a child-friendly hula class, please get in touch.

What do I need to bring to class apart from my pāʻū?
– Water
– Some way to take notes (paper & pen, note-taking app etc.). Please note audio and video recordings are not permitted
– Electronic device OR binder OR bound notebook with all your notes so far, including translations, background research etc.
– Optional but helpful to carry around: Pocket Hawaiian Dictionary, Mary Pukui & Samuel Ebert
– Optional but helpful for comprehensiveness: Hawaiian Dictionary, Mary Pukui & Samuel Ebert

What do I wear?
– T-shirt or tank/long sleeve top; no crops, bras, branding or bare backs/bellies
– Pāʻū (hula skirt): regulars see below; new joiners or beginners can start with a sarong/pareu or any other pāʻū (purchased, self-made, from another hālau etc.)
– If your pāʻū is open to one or both sides, wear leggings, joggers or knee-length shorts underneath
– If you have a sarong/pareu, make sure it is tied knee-length or longer and wear leggings, joggers or knee-length shorts underneath
– If you don’t have any of the above, leggings or joggers are fine; shorts are also OK if at least knee-length (e.g. board shorts) 
– Hair should be neat and ideally off the face (ponytail, bun, hairband etc.)
– Minimal jewellery only
– Barefoot is standard; if you need to wear something on your feet make sure it is non-slip
– Please no fake lei or oversize hair accessories – especially not plastic (our oceans thank you 🧡)

CLASS SKIRTS (pāʻū)
Regular students wear plain royal blue pāʻū for class. You should make your own – please message beforehand for specifications – but I also offer to make for you, please message for details.

Any other questions?